Jonathan Monk at Meyer Riegger, Karlsruhe

Jonathan Monk is participating in the Group Show: A Means To An End at Meyer Riegger, Karlsruhe alongside Franz Ackermann, Miriam Cahn, Anna Lea HuchtJamie Isenstein MeuserJohn Miller, Daniel Roth, Silke SchatzDavid Thorpe, Waldemar Zimbelmann, Jan Zöller from June 12 – July 24, 2020

Thomas Hirschhorn at Mudam Luxembourg

Thomas Hirschhorn’s installation ‘World Airport’ is on show at the group exhibition ‘Me, Family’ at Mudam Luxembourg. Inspired by the landmark exhibition ‘The Family of Man’ (1955), conceived by Edward Steichen, ‘Me, Family’ bears witness to the great questions of our age. The exhibition presents the work of contemporary artists who work across various media and disciplines, exploring the ways in which humanity seeks to express its diverse and coexistent histories as well as the issues of that society finds itself confronted with today. ‘Me, Family’ takes as its starting point a reality that is at once beautiful, dramatic and exhilarating, offering a journey through contemporary art, social networks, fashion, information technologies, advertising, sound, music and performance art. May 30 – September 06, 2020.

Lawrence Weiner at Kunstmuseum Stuttgart

The group exhibition ‘WÄNDE | WALLS’ at Kunstmuseum Stuttgart shows art works by Lawrence Weiner. The exhibition engages with the artistic discourse concerning spatial borders from the late 1960s to the present day. The international loans reach out far beyond the obvious media of murals and wall drawings and also embrace performative, sculptural and installative approaches. While murals are realised in the interior of the Kunstmuseum, a cooperation exhibition with the StadtPalais – Museum für Stuttgart is devoted to graffiti art in the urban area of Stuttgart. May 16 – October 11, 2020.

Douglas Gordon at Kunstmuseum Wolfsburg

Douglas Gordon’s work ’30 seconds text’ is part of the group exhibition ‘Power! Light!’ at the Kunstmuseum Wolfsburg in Wolfsburg, Germany. In the early years of modernism, artificial light was positively connotated and regarded as a symbol of modern life. In the course of the twentieth century, however, dark stains increasingly appeared on the pure white vest of light: Today, despite all technical developments and undeniable advantages, light is also associated with luminous pollution and energy wastage. The exhibition ‘Power! Light! at the Kunstmuseum Wolfsburg presents artistic positions—based on selected light art works from its own collection—which consciously focus on political, ecological, or social statements and critically comment on the (thoughtless) use of light—and thus also in a figurative sense on the use of resources in general. May 16 – September 13, 2020.

Nedko Solakov at Tate Modern, London

Nedko Solakov’s performance work  ‘A Life (Black & White)’ is on show at the Tate Modern on occasion of the Museum’s 20th anniversary that is celebrated on May 11, 2020. In the performance, two workers continuously paint the gallery walls. One uses black paint and the other uses white. The painters follow each other around the space, painting over each other’s work. This is constantly repeated for the length of time the work is on display. The materials used in the performance are also laid out in the space. These include tins of paint, rollers, rags and signs for the painters’ breaks. In A Life (Black & White), Solakov is exploring issues about work, labour, time and repetition. The piece also comments on the process of making a painting, but here the paint is applied directly onto the gallery wall instead of a canvas. As well as performance, Solakov makes work in media such as drawing, painting, video and installation. He explains ‘I am telling stories in space’. He frequently plays with the expectations of his audience, using humour to convey political concerns, often about his native Bulgaria. His work also playfully questions the conventions used in galleries and other art institutions. ‘Tate Modern Turns 20″ – May 11, 2020.

Sarah Ortmeyer at Riga International Biennial of Contemporary Art

Sarah Ortmeyer will participate at the Riga International Biennial of Contemporary Art. The Riga International Biennial of Contemporary Art (RIBOCA) is an international biennial with a European focus and a strong regional profile, founded in 2016. Taking the rich history of Riga and the Baltic states as its underlying framework, the Biennial highlights the artistic landscape of the wider region and creates opportunities for artists to enter into dialogue with the cultural, historical and socio-political context of the city and its geographic surrounds. May 6 – October 11, 2020.

Douglas Gordon at Hauser & Wirth, New York City

Hauser & Wirth presents ‘The Bride of God,’ a group exhibition inaugurating its new building, designed by Selldorf Architects, at 542 West 22nd Street in the West Chelsea Arts District. Curated by Philip Larratt-Smith, the exhibition takes its title and inspiration from Daniel Paul Schreber’s 1903 book ‘Memoirs of My Nervous Illness,’ a landmark in the history of psychoanalysis that has inspired countless analysts, intellectuals, and artists. Including modern and contemporary paintings, sculptures, installations, and video works, as well as an array of vernacular photographs, objects, and films, ‘The Bride of God’ will unfold throughout the galleries of both the new building and the adjacent former Dia Center for the Arts building. Douglas Gordon is part of this exhibition. May 2 – July 30, 2020.